Newsletters

Summer 2022

Summers are generally a chance to relax in better weather, enjoy some time off and potentially get abroad. This year, however, all of these come with added stress for many households and businesses.

The implications of steadily rising inflation on the cost of living, particularly energy and food prices, are focusing minds across the country. With wages lagging behind the headline figures, the impact on every level of financial planning – from everyday budgeting and saving decisions to those all-important holidays – is a reality for most.

If you are near retirement, you may be concerned both about timing stepping away from work and funding your lifestyle in the current economic climate. Every month this year has seen another hike in inflation, with the Bank of England predicting a two-year wait for a return to January 2022 levels. Our feature in this edition of our newsletter considers the impact for those who may need to reassess their options. Please contact us for tailored advice.

Although the rise in inflation has meant interest rates have started to creep above zero, savings account holders are unlikely to have much of those increases passed on to them. Shareholders could be in the best position this year with dividend payments predicted to grow further from their strong recovery in 2021. However, how you think about investment returns may need to shift when measured against those inflation figures.

Other stories for this edition include:

  •  Could you join the one in five? By 2025/26 nearly 20% of UK taxpayers could be paying the higher rate following three years of threshold freezes and the current rise in inflation. Look to using tax allowances and advantages for spouses and civil partners to mitigate the effects

  • What I wish I’d known – lessons from the other side of 50 Although many of us may be resistant to taking our parents’ advice, younger family members could take heed from a survey revealing two thirds of retirees wished they had saved more earlier into their pension

  • Charitable giving – doing it right While anyone who gives to charity is surely now aware that ticking gift aid boosts a donation by 25%, there are also several other schemes that offer benefits to the taxpayer too

Now is a good time to prepare for the increased challenges coming later this year. We are happy to discuss anything arising from the topics addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the autumn.

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Spring 2022

As we were finalising the Spring edition of our newsletter, the world watched aghast as Russia invaded Ukraine. Having spent two years consumed with the worldwide transmission of Covid-19 and the resultant disruption to our lives, what should have been momentous developments – the gradual lifting of restrictions around the UK – has taken a back seat. The Russian attack on Ukraine at the end of February now dominates the news agenda. While the suffering of the Ukrainian population, and millions of refugees fleeing their homes in fear for their lives, are of paramount concern, the ramping up of sanctions imposed on Russia by the West are likely to have a wider effect beyond the region.
 
Even before this latest crisis, and despite the hopes for many of almost getting back to ‘business as usual’, the economic fallout from the pandemic is hitting home this year. Rising inflation coincides with the increase to National Insurance contributions and dividend tax slated to come in from 6 April, all of which contribute to concerns on the rising cost of living. We cover these issues in our first newsletter for 2022. Our feature considers how gifting from income can help you structure your estate planning the light of frozen inheritance tax thresholds and the Chancellor’s decision to keep the tax broadly unchanged.

Our other stories include:

  • Counting cost of the frozen tax landscape We consider the strategies to minimise the impact of the national insurance and dividend tax rises and tax threshold freezes. Those nearer the threshold boundaries can benefit most.
  • Who gets to choose when you retire? Research by Aviva reveals the UK’s most popular age for early retirement is 60. With the State pension age still under review, is your retirement plan set up to achieve this?
  • Tax loophole closing on second homes Second home owners in the UK have been able to declare an intention to let their property to access small business rates relief and avoid paying council tax, but from April 2023 they are going to have to provide evidence.

As we watch the mounting carnage in Ukraine and seek ways to help the humanitarian relief effort, it may seem difficult to focus on these issues nearer home. We are happy discuss anything arising from the topics addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the summer.

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Winter 2021

With the widespread take up of the Covid-19 vaccination, and the latest booster campaign offering a third vaccine to all adults, we’ve all been looking forward to a more festive season than last year. The advent of the latest omicron variant unfortunately seems likely to put a damper on some of that optimism. Although planning how to maintain a family Christmas may be top of your list for now, the new year will soon be upon us, traditionally a good time to make sure your finances are in order.
As there is no spring Budget on the cards for 2022, we can plan more confidently without worrying about what might be sprung on us in April. While the Chancellor has committed to taxes going down by the end of the parliament, from April they are most definitely going up, so our feature looks at the best ways to make sure you are in a good position for the new tax year. Late in November, the Treasury finally also took the options for revising capital gains tax and inheritance tax off the table, making year end planning more straightforward.

Our other stories include:

  • The cost of retirement: setting your own standard Following on from our story in the last newsletter about the growing trend for phased retirement, in this issue we consider a recent report that puts a price on minimum, moderate and comfortable living standards in retirement, highlighting the gap you will need to fill from state provision.
  • Social care plans for England: not all they seem As more of the detail emerges on the new social care plans in England, we look closely at the numbers and implications.
  • Christmas gifts that keep on giving If you want to avoid that sinking feeling from the words ‘out of stock online’ and guarantee your gift can’t be spoiled by delayed delivery, you could consider investing on behalf of children or grandchildren this year and setting up a fund for the child’s future.

We are happy to talk you through any of the issues addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the spring when the new tax year will be almost upon us.

In the meantime we wish you all the best for a Happy Christmas and prosperous New Year.
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Autumn 2021

The first weeks of September were busy for the government, announcing a new health and social care levy on national insurance contributions, suspending the pension triple lock for next year and adding an Autumn Budget and Spending Review to our calendars for 27 October. As part of a broader approach on how the country will deal with the fall-out of the pandemic these measures will have far-reaching consequences when they come into force next year.
In the meantime, the pandemic has also had an effect not only working lives but also retirement patterns. The numbers of older people remaining in work has been increasing. Many reaching retirement age are choosing, where possible, to remain in work part time rather than make the dramatic shift from full time to leisure. In our feature in the latest edition of our newsletters, we focus on the ‘new retirement’, phasing the end of work and managing the costs of retirement. The new Health and Social Care Levy Bill, now making its way through parliament, will add a further tax on those working in retirement which will also now have to be taken into account.

Our other stories include:

  • Income protection – a simple safety net Unexpected life events are exactly that: unexpected. While having a rainy day fund remains important, what the past two years have shown us is that a back-up plan, such as protection policies, brings additional security if you are suddenly unable to work.
  • The return of inflation? The jump in inflation in the first seven months of 2021 has left some economists feeling anxious about a potential return to a wage/price increase spiral. Whether this is a short-term reaction to the pandemic or a longer term problem, it could have a knock-on effect on the value of your holdings.
  • No fault divorce From April 2022 divorce law in England and Wales is changing. Couples looking to separate will be able to cite irretrievable breakdown, and if only one partner is seeking divorce, the other will not be able to contest it. Reaching a mutually acceptable financial settlement may not be so simple, so taking advice is important.

We are happy to talk you through any of the issues addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the winter when we will be evaluating the impact of the Chancellor’s announcements in the second Budget of 2021.

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Summer 2021

From the high of expectation of the lifting of final lockdown restrictions, we are now into a further month of waiting on data and the continued hoped-for success of the vaccination programme. While the world’s leaders met for the G7 summit in Cornwall in a wave of optimism allied to an upturn in summer weather, the delay of the June re-opening further highlights how far we are still from ‘a return to normal’.
As with the warmer temperatures, however, there are some positive developments. For one thing, as we highlight in the summer edition of our newsletter, markets are looking up. Evidence is pointing to an uptick in dividends and one-off payments to shareholders in 2021 following sharp falls in 2020. Even the worst-case scenario predicts positive change.
Looking further afield, in our feature for this edition we examine inheritance tax (IHT). As house prices continue to rise, and following the Chancellor’s freezing of the IHT threshold for the next five years, increasing numbers of estates will become subject to IHT. Yet more than 50% of adults over 55 in the UK do not have any idea of how their estate will be taxed. While we may not relish looking towards the end of our lives, estate planning can help support your loved ones when you are no longer around. Our article looks at the current inheritance tax rules and how they are likely to change in the near future.

Our other stories include:

  • Tax planning for families As the freezing of several key tax thresholds heralds a decline in real income over the next five years, we look at ways for couples to maximise the use of tax allowances and reliefs.
  • Portfolio rebalancing Choosing a set of investments for your portfolio may seem like a short-term process, but investments need to be curated and reviewed. Allowing portfolio to coast could mean the erosion of the diversity you thought you had put in place, potentially weakening your position.
  • ‘Greenwashing’ warning As growing numbers of ESG funds promise investors both returns on their money and support for businesses concerned with sustainability and ethical practices, be warned. While legislation takes a while to catch up, you may need to look beneath the surface to check a fund’s credentials.

We are happy to talk you through any of the issues addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the autumn when we will be anticipating the Chancellor’s next moves in the second Budget of 2021.

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Spring 2021

The success of the Covid-19 vaccine roll-out brings hope that June could really mean the end of restrictions on daily life. With many people forced to tighten their belts over the last year, the focus in this spring issue is on both personal and national financial recovery.
In our feature for this edition of our newsletter we examine the Chancellor’s long-awaited recovery plan following the extraordinary spending throughout 2020/21 and the start of 2021/22. Some tax changes are as predicted: the corporation tax rate will rise considerably, although not for another two years, while expected adjustments for inflation for IHT did not materialise. Instead, IHT joined a host of other tax thresholds frozen for the next five years, with implications for your real tax rates in the future. 

Our other stories include:

  • What can we learn from the Covid-19 pandemic? The lesson of being prepared was never more important than over the past 12 months. Having insurance in place and some savings can help withstand the shocks of unexpected events.
  • Intergenerational appeal of ESG investing The last year has seen a significant rise in the popularity of ESG funds. New legislation will soon ensure that financial advisers must discuss ESG investing with their clients as joins the mainstream.
  • State pension rise still locked The triple lock means a rise in the state pension of 2% above inflation for those receiving the old and new state pensions, but the level still falls behind the National Living Wage.
  • What is £1 million really worth? A lot of big numbers have been bandied around over the last year – with £2.1 trillion the size of both the UK economy and the government debt. But even £1 million won’t go as far as you might think.

We are happy to talk you through any of the issues addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the Summer when we all hope to have turned a corner towards a more familiar future.

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Winter 2020

Reports of several viable Covid-19 vaccines, and the extension of government schemes into the new year, should bring us some festive cheer at the end of this difficult year. We may be able to really look forward to life returning to something closer to normal, but the knowledge that in 2021 we will have to start to pay for 2020’s extraordinary support measures weighs heavy.
The lack of a Budget until next spring makes forward planning a little more difficult. With government borrowing at previously unheard-of levels in peacetime, it seems inevitable that the effects will be felt in raised taxes to come. In the feature for the winter edition of our newsletter, we focus on the year end tax planning measures you can start to take now to minimise your bill for 2020/21 and exert some control over your finances.

Our other stories include:

  • The importance of diversification With the UK stock market reflecting the tumultuous turns of the year, we discuss one of the key rules of investment management – a diversified portfolio.
  •  The pandemic retirement conundrum While many workers have been severely affected by the impact of Covid-19, those towards the end of their working life have different anxieties to manage. If you have had to retire early or put off your retirement date, we look at the impact on retirement plans.
  • Scams on the rise The pandemic has seen a worrying increase in the number and sophistication of fraudulent phone and email messages. Exploiting people’s current fears about finances and their health, the scammers are becoming cleverer at accessing our personal information. We highlight some of the methods to be wary of.
  • Savers feel the pinch While interest rates on many savings accounts are almost zero, there is some good news as new accounts are introduced to the market, but customers will have to move fast as numbers of savers are limited.
     
We are happy to talk you through any of the issues addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you in the Spring, with a new Budget, a new president in the White House and perhaps an accompanying new era of trade deals for the UK. 
We wish you all the best for Christmas and the new year.
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Autumn 2020

September is upon us already and with it a slow return to some semblance of normality, with offices gradually reopening, schools re-starting and, despite the exam-based issues of the summer, this year’s cohort of new undergraduates about to embark on their fresher year. 
 
Our latest newsletter considers some of the financial impacts of the last few months – on personal savings, student loans and on global markets – as well as looking into the near future with some tentative information about the upcoming Budget (unusually the second one we’ll be seeing in 2020). 
 
Many are predicting that the Autumn Budget will be where the Chancellor introduces countermeasures to balance out recent Covid-19-related government borrowing: if so, where will Mr Sunak look to raise revenue?

Our other stories include             

  • ESG investment comes into its own Funds that focus on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues of the companies they invest in – such as supply chains and corporate social responsibility – have performed well in the last six months, suggesting that a principled approach to investment doesn’t necessarily mean forgoing healthy returns.
  •  A buy-to-let opportunity? Changes to stamp duty land tax (SDLT) and its Scottish counterpart may make buy-to-let investments seem like an attractive option, but other tax changes muddy the waters.
  • Women’s state pension shortfall The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has discovered that a historic flaw in the system left many women on the old State Pension short of money to which they were entitled. Women who fit into certain criteria are encouraged to contact DWP to redress the issue.
  • Student debt: to pay or not to pay? While repaying debts as soon as possible is generally a sensible move, the debt from student loans is written-off by the government after 30 years, which calls into question the benefits of spending capital in repaying ahead of time.

We are happy to talk you through any of the issues addressed in our newsletter. Our next edition will be with you towards the end of the year, by which time the implications of the upcoming Budget will bring some clarity regarding personal finances and investments. 

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Summer 2020

Nobody could have predicted the outcome of the last few months. While the unprecedented disruption to our personal and professional lives continues to take a toll, the long term financial impact of turbulence in the markets on savings and investment plans is becoming clearer.
 
In the latest edition of our newsletter we look at some of the financial implications of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown, from pensions to personal protection. With the extraordinary example of centenarian Captain, soon to be Sir, Tom Moore before us, we look at how living longer requires longer-term planning for good quality, as well as quantity, of life. At the other end of the journey, we also report on options for younger savers, in the form of CTFs and Junior ISAs, looking to the future.

Our other stories include:

  • It will happen to you Covid-19 has forced people to think about something they’d rather ignore – their will. Over half of the UK adult population currently have no will, leaving their estate to the mercy of intestacy laws. Solicitors have seen a sharp uptake in will-writing services during lockdown Ensure you have an up to date will and revisit your estate planning regularly.
  • Time to review your drawdown plans? Turbulence in the markets in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic has taken its toll on portfolios. If you draw a pension, it’s wise to review your savings and drawdown plans to prepare for future fluctuations.
  • Leaving it to chance? The State benefit system has come under scrutiny under the coronavirus lockdown, highlighting gaps in provision. It’s even more important now to consider personal financial provision rather than relying on social security.
  • The kids are alright September will see the first generation of child trust funds (CTFs) coming to maturity when their owners reach 18. CTFs are closed to new applicants but their replacement, the Junior ISA, may offer better interest rates and greater product choice. We explain the alternatives.
As ever, if you think you may be affected by any of our stories, do get in touch with us. Our next update will come in the autumn, with – we hope – the worst of the pandemic behind us. We wish you a happy and healthy summer.
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Spring 2020

Nobody could have predicted the outcome of the last few months. While the unprecedented disruption to our personal and professional lives continues to take a toll, the long term financial impact of turbulence in the markets on savings and investment plans is becoming clearer.
 
In the latest edition of our newsletter we look at some of the financial implications of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown, from pensions to personal protection. With the extraordinary example of centenarian Captain, soon to be Sir, Tom Moore before us, we look at how living longer requires longer-term planning for good quality, as well as quantity, of life. At the other end of the journey, we also report on options for younger savers, in the form of CTFs and Junior ISAs, looking to the future.

Our other stories include:

  • It will happen to you Covid-19 has forced people to think about something they’d rather ignore – their will. Over half of the UK adult population currently have no will, leaving their estate to the mercy of intestacy laws. Solicitors have seen a sharp uptake in will-writing services during lockdown Ensure you have an up to date will and revisit your estate planning regularly.
  • Time to review your drawdown plans? Turbulence in the markets in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic has taken its toll on portfolios. If you draw a pension, it’s wise to review your savings and drawdown plans to prepare for future fluctuations.
  • Leaving it to chance? The State benefit system has come under scrutiny under the coronavirus lockdown, highlighting gaps in provision. It’s even more important now to consider personal financial provision rather than relying on social security.
  • The kids are alright September will see the first generation of child trust funds (CTFs) coming to maturity when their owners reach 18. CTFs are closed to new applicants but their replacement, the Junior ISA, may offer better interest rates and greater product choice. We explain the alternatives.
As ever, if you think you may be affected by any of our stories, do get in touch with us. Our next update will come in the autumn, with – we hope – the worst of the pandemic behind us. We wish you a happy and healthy summer.
 
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Winter 2019

We’ve nearly made it to the end of a tumultuous year and the turmoil isn’t over yet. Our latest newsletter went to print just before the general election, the outcome of which will have a profound effect on the future direction of the country.

Political uncertainties on both sides of the Atlantic are symptomatic of the strange behaviour analysts are seeing in the stock market. In our feature for this edition we look at the peculiar case of the behaviour of UK shares versus government bonds. The last ten years have seen a reversal in previous trends, with dividend yield on UK shares overtaking the returns on government bonds. There are similar scenarios across other world markets, as lower interest rates look set to become the new normal. Guidance on selecting suitable funds may be more important than ever.

As we all brace for the seasonal tradition known as holiday shopping, we offer a few strategies to help you keep a check on spending. With credit cards and contactless payment lessening the ‘pain’ of handing over money, some forethought could help you set up some better spending habits into the new year

Our other stories include:

  • Caught in pension allowance tax traps? Over the last ten years the standard lifetime allowance has been almost halved, and the annual tax relievable pension contribution allowance slashed to just 15% of its former size. Some earners are now finding themselves with unexpected tax bills.
  • All change on company car tax: The introduction from April of new WLTP car emission standards mean the company car benefit tax system will receive a considerable overhaul.
  • It’s easier being green: investing on principle As climate change has topped the international agenda, increasing numbers of individual investors seek to invest in line with their principles and focus on environmental, social and governance-based funds. It’s your money and you can make a difference.
  • It won’t happen to me: protecting your income: Income protection may seem an unnecessary expense for a fit, successful employee, but with another wave of big high street retailers failing, it could be prudent to make sure you have a back up plan in place.
 
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Autumn 2019

We are living in very peculiar times. This might even be an understatement after what has happened in the news recently. Political news does not seem to slow down especially with a new and upcoming Brexit deadline. It is fair to say that the uncertainty about what will happen in the coming months has increased dramatically. Such major events make it easy for other important regulatory changes to slip under the radar.

‘Holding steady in volatile times’ would be an appropriate statement and, in this newsletter, we hope to shine light on other important issues which could impact your financial planning and in general taxpayers across the country such as proposals to simplify Inheritance Tax, growing criticisms of university fees and the impact workplace pensions has had since its inception.

Whilst not every article may be relevant to you, we hope you find the contents of this newsletter useful and informative and, as always, let us know if you think you may be affected by any of the topics in this edition.

Our other stories include:

  • Simplifying the inheritance tax rules – Major changes to inheritance tax (IHT) are proposed by the government’s Office of Tax Simplification (OTS) which could alter your estate planning.

  • Taking the long view on your investments? – Trade wars between the US and China, as well as Brexit and tensions in various parts of the world have all made markets more volatile in recent months. Unsurprisingly, private investors have become more nervous.
  • Time for a university fees shake-up? – A review of post-18 education in England has put student financing under the spotlight yet again – and could be the subject of another bout of reform.
  • Workplace pensions – good start but not enough – This October marks the seventh anniversary of the start of workplace pension auto-enrolment, perhaps proving that some grand government schemes can be a success.

 
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Summer 2019

Expectations and planning are two words which appear to have wandered into the long grass in 2019 so far. With continuing political uncertainty and now a leadership election in full swing, you might be forgiven for sitting back and putting everything on hold.

While John Lennon famously sang that ‘Life happens when you’re busy making other plans’, the reverse is also true. It continues when you’re making no plans at all. As far as financial planning is concerned, some things can’t wait.

Our feature in the Summer edition of our latest newsletter focuses on the perennial issue of pension contributions. As we all know, the earlier we start to save towards retirement, the better off we’ll be. With the latest increase to auto-enrolment contribution rates from April, you may think you’re in a much better position. But as our title asks ‘How much is enough for pension contributions?’ The answer may surprise you

Our other stories include:

 
  • Dividends riding high, but...: Investors in UK-listed companies enjoyed record level dividend payouts in early 2019, but recently announced cuts from some high profile companies have clouded the picture.
  • Pensions and divorce – not just about the split: With the emotional turmoil and complexities surrounding divorce, the most valuable asset – your pension funds – can easily be overlooked.
  • Balancing the school fees equation: The cost of private education in the UK is increasing at nearly double the rate of inflation. Despite this, record numbers of pupils are attending independent schools. We offer strategies to make sure you stay on top of rising costs.
  • New headaches for landlords: Property owners may be feeling under siege with profits squeezed as income tax relief has been curtailed and now new legislation around evicting tenants. Will the changes protect vulnerable tenants from unscrupulous landlords, or make evictions of problem tenants more difficult?
 
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Spring 2019

It’s almost impossible to predict the near future with any certainty, particularly in this final month before the UK’s planned exit from the EU. We focus in this edition of our newsletter on what we do know will be happening and how steer a steady course.


Our feature article is about preparing for the new 2019/20 tax year – one of the few certainties this year. We highlight the rise in the higher rate income tax threshold for taxpayers outside Scotland, as well as the impact rises in the NIC threshold and auto-enrolment contributions will have on disposable income across the UK.

Our other stories include:

  • Planning the 100-year life: Be prepared: statistics show that the younger you are, the older you are likely to become and the more money you will need to fund your retirement.
  • Building your assets with infrastructure funds: Previously less accessible to retail investors, new energy and infrastructure funds offer investment opportunities not closely linked to the values of most other shares or bonds.
  • Keeping your head – the psychology of investment: Surprisingly, people’s investment instincts are often governed by confirmation bias rather than detached logic. How aware are you of what might be driving your decisions?
  • Just in case: protecting against income cuts: As the roll-out of universal credit slowly continues you may wish to insure against potential income loss so you don’t experience a drop in lifestyle if your circumstances ever come under pressure.
 
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Winter 2018

Welcome to our winter newsletter, which brings you fresh news and advice on your money and investment opportunities.

Our feature story this time looks at the details of the 2018 Budget, and how those headline increases play out across the rest of the tax system.

Alongside that we look at the booming US stock market and the growing
market for ethical and socially responsible investment funds.

With recent data showing increasing life expectancy we offer some guidance on using annuities to guarantee an income in retirement.

We also cover the key facts for your credit rating, and offer some tips on how to manage your data.

Our other stories include:

Lessons from a record bull run: The record run, and ongoing strong performance, of US markets offers some food for thought on investment allocation strategies.
• Don’t ignore your credit report: With high-profile data breaches affecting millions, keeping a good credit rating could be about more than paying bills on time.
• Growing ethical investment for sustainable returns: The data shows interest in ethical investment options is growing rapidly, and new rules for fund trustees could accelerate that trend further.
• Annuity options for long-life planning: With life expectancies dramatically increased over the last 20 years, we look at the role of annuities in guaranteeing an income throughout your retirement.

 
 
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Autumn 2018

Welcome to the autumn edition of our newsletter, covering the latest developments as the country moves towards winter and the next Budget.

Our feature story is about the lifelong journey of supporting children financially.

We also look at lifetime gifts and possible changes to inheritance tax. For pensions we have essential advice for anyone planning their first lump sum withdrawal, and a look back at six years of auto enrolment.

And for investment we offer help on decoding fund fees, and how to use market indexes in your investment planning.

Our other stories include:

  • Don't be caught by the pension tax trap: You may be over-taxed on your first pension lump sum withdrawal.
  • Financing a child's future: Supporting children financially is a long-term task that could need careful planning.
  • Auto enrolement six years on: Workplace pension membership is rising, but will your savings be enough in retiement?
  • Shedding light on fund fees: Despite efforts to improve the situation, fund fees are still complex to understand.
  • Thinking of making lifetime gifts?: The current generous treatment of gifts could be changed in the next budget.
  • The ins and outs of market indices: Successful investment strategies should remember that companies in indexes can change regularly.
 
 
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Summer 2018

Welcome to the summer edition of our newsletter where, as the year starts to flourish, we continue to look for ways to help your money do the same. Amongst the many planning opportunities open to you we look this time at the ISA family and how you can make the most of your regular savings. With savings in mind, we take a look at market investments across UK dividends and the changing environment for VCTs and investing in enterprise businesses. We offer thoughts on interest rates, which are pegged to rise this year, as well as the impact of inflation on frozen tax thresholds. We understand these are complex and unpredictable times, and are on hand to help you plan your path through them.

Our other stories include:

  • A new era for VCTs and EISs: Investment in venture enterprises has been overhauled with new ‘risk-to-capital’ rules coming into effect.
  • Reduced protection for mortgage payments: Support for Mortgage Interest became a loan – instead of a benefit – from April 2018.
  • Stuck in frozen tax thresholds?: The Exchequer doesn’t need to raise taxes to cost you money. We look at ways of dealing with inflation increasing your costs.
  • Interest rates are set to rise: With increases to the interest rate expected during 2018, what effect will this have on your savings and investments?
 
 
 
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Spring 2018

With the new tax year about to begin everyone is focused on the here and  now. Annual allowances are about to expire, meaning decisions need to be made.
But our eyes are also on the future, with key changes affecting pensions. As well as the lifetime allowance increasing after a long break, there are the forthcoming increases to the state pension age and automatic-enrolment contributions. Closer to, we also look at the changes to tax relief affecting buy-to-let mortgages and the potential savings from relevant life policies. As ever, if you are affected by any of our stories get in touch so we can discuss your circumstances.

Our other stories include:

 
  • Tax relief reductions affecting Landlords: The phased reduction of tax relief on interest for buy-to-let landlords could mean your costs change significantly.
  • The new tax year begins:
  • Time is running out: For you to make the most of your allowances and exemptions.
  • The lifetime allowance increases: At last, what does the first increase to the allowance
    since 2012 mean for your pension planning?
  • The savings from relevant life
    policies: Could you be taking advantage of this taxefficient
    form of insurance?
  • State pension age continues to rise: Retirement moves further away for the younger generations, so are your plans still right for you?
 
 
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